May 17th, 2013
ljdigital

Students, Professors: We Want Your Best #College #Longreads

longreads:

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Throughout May and June, a new generation of reporters, writers, editors, and essayists make their way out of school and into the professional world. They come bearing clips, work samples produced for class or during an internship. Hundreds of media outlets at colleges and universities across the country publish student work, and an equal number of professors, instructors, and advisors help students report, write, and edit their best journalism. We’d like to encourage those writers to produce more and better work, and introduce these new voices to a wider audience of readers—and maybe even future employers and mentors.

To help in this effort, we’ve teamed up with Aileen Gallagher, assistant professor at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, to help search for and share outstanding student work.

Students, writers, publishers, professors: We need your help to find and share the best work of the past year.

If you’ve read (or written) something this school year, just tag it #college #longreads on Twitter or Tumblr, or email it to aileen@longreads.com.

Student publications are the easiest and best place to find college #longreads, like Mary Kenney’s account of an Indian sex worker, published earlier this year by Indiana University’s INSIDE magazine. Or Project Wordsworth, the outstanding new pay-what-you-want experiment from Michael Shapiro and students at Columbia University.

Sometimes a piece that a student writes for class, such as the one Syracuse University grad student Danielle Preiss wrote about high suicide rates among Bhutanese refugees, lands in a professional outlet. And of course, we’ll also tout good work produced by students as part of a fellowship or internship, like Columbia undergrad Jack Dickey’s investigation for Deadspin about Manti Te’o.

The only rules for #college #longreads are: Stories should be over 1,500 words and written by a student enrolled in a college or university at the time of publication.

Share stories worth reading by tagging them #college #longreads.

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Know of a writer or publication we should keep an eye on? Tell us about it in the comments below.

LJ Digital: Calling all literary journalism students! Check out this spectacular opportunity to submit your stories to Longreads.com! If you are unfamiliar with Longreads, it is a website that aggregates literary journalism pieces and is constantly posting new stories for you to read. There is NO deadline to submit and this opportunity is designed for students in our program so hop to it. Polish those stories up, get a few more pairs of eyes to read them, and SUBMIT! 

Reblogged from Longreads
May 11th, 2013
ljdigital
April 16th, 2013
ljdigital
Journalism
PUBLIC SERVICE - Sun Sentinel, Fort Lauderdale, FL
BREAKING NEWS REPORTING - The Denver Post Staff
INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING - David Barstow and Alejandra Xanic von Bertrab of The New York Times
EXPLANATORY REPORTING - The New York Times Staff
LOCAL REPORTING - Brad Schrade, Jeremy Olson and Glenn Howatt of the Star Tribune, Minneapolis
NATIONAL REPORTING - Lisa Song, Elizabeth McGowan and David Hasemyer of InsideClimate News, Brooklyn, NY
INTERNATIONAL REPORTING - David Barboza of The New York Times
FEATURE WRITING - John Branch of The New York Times
COMMENTARY - Bret Stephens of The Wall Street Journal
CRITICISM - Philip Kennicott of The Washington Post
EDITORIAL WRITING - Tim Nickens and Daniel Ruth of the Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, FL
EDITORIAL CARTOONING - Steve Sack of the Star Tribune, Minneapolis
BREAKING NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY - Rodrigo Abd, Manu Brabo, Narciso Contreras, Khalil Hamra and Muhammed Muheisen of the Associated Press
FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY - Javier Manzano, free-lance photographer, Agence France-Presse
Letters, Drama and Music
FICTION - “The Orphan Master’s Son” by Adam Johnson
DRAMA - “Disgraced” by Ayad Akhtar
HISTORY - “Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam” by Fredrik Logevall (Random House),
BIOGRAPHY - “The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo” by Tom Reiss (Crown)
POETRY - “Stag’s Leap” by Sharon Olds
GENERAL NONFICTION - “Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America” by Gilbert King (Harper)
MUSIC - “Partita for 8 Voices” by Caroline Shaw, recording released on October 30, 2012 (New Amsterdam Records)
2013 PULITZER PRIZE NOMINATED FINALISTS

Journalism

PUBLIC SERVICE - Sun Sentinel, Fort Lauderdale, FL

BREAKING NEWS REPORTING - The Denver Post Staff

INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING - David Barstow and Alejandra Xanic von Bertrab of The New York Times

EXPLANATORY REPORTING - The New York Times Staff

LOCAL REPORTING - Brad Schrade, Jeremy Olson and Glenn Howatt of the Star Tribune, Minneapolis

NATIONAL REPORTING - Lisa Song, Elizabeth McGowan and David Hasemyer of InsideClimate News, Brooklyn, NY

INTERNATIONAL REPORTING - David Barboza of The New York Times

FEATURE WRITING - John Branch of The New York Times

COMMENTARY - Bret Stephens of The Wall Street Journal

CRITICISM - Philip Kennicott of The Washington Post

EDITORIAL WRITING - Tim Nickens and Daniel Ruth of the Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, FL

EDITORIAL CARTOONING - Steve Sack of the Star Tribune, Minneapolis

BREAKING NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY - Rodrigo Abd, Manu Brabo, Narciso Contreras, Khalil Hamra and Muhammed Muheisen of the Associated Press

FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY - Javier Manzano, free-lance photographer, Agence France-Presse

Letters, Drama and Music

FICTION - “The Orphan Master’s Son” by Adam Johnson

DRAMA - “Disgraced” by Ayad Akhtar

HISTORY - “Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam” by Fredrik Logevall (Random House),

BIOGRAPHY - “The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo” by Tom Reiss (Crown)

POETRY - “Stag’s Leap” by Sharon Olds

GENERAL NONFICTION - “Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America” by Gilbert King (Harper)

MUSIC - “Partita for 8 Voices” by Caroline Shaw, recording released on October 30, 2012 (New Amsterdam Records)

2013 PULITZER PRIZE NOMINATED FINALISTS

April 9th, 2013
ljdigital
August 14th, 2012
ljdigital

Start Your Journalism Career Now!

Storyful gets you learning about real news with real professionals without the real-time annoyance. Authentic stories that arise in the sidelines of major events that people brush off have a chance to be told at Storyful. 

We work with professional news clients, acting as a social media ‘field producer’. We provide news organisations with early warning of big stories, discovering and verifying content and contacts through a combination of good journalism and pioneering technology.

We work hard to identify new, credible sources close to every story – freelance journalists, activists, talented amateurs, aid workers and others – and connect them with our clients.

Storyful’s professional tools make journalists smarter and more productive. It is the first tool-kit for newsrooms who want to blend social media into their newsgathering operations.

Storyful.com, our public site, is a window onto the kind of stories that we find for news clients every day, curated by Storyful’s editorial team.

This is an excellent site to being your journalism career now! Take a gander and start telling stories!

(photos courtesy of blog.storyful.com)

August 7th, 2012
ljdigital

Check out Narratively’s Kickstarter

Narratively is going to be a new way of online storytelling but is strictly geared toward the eccentric stories found in the corners of New York. Watch the video if you have time and donate if you can. Let’s help these awesome journalists out! 

June 20th, 2012
ljdigital

Welcome to The Rondure!

The Rondure is an application designed by a handful of students from Narratives in the Digital Age. They used a Wordpress to display what their multimedia app would do. Similar to the Atavist, The Rondure adds multimedia features to their long form journalism stories. However, these students are emphasizing the publication of international stories. Check out the first story published on the Wordpress written by one of the group members. 

Editor-in-Chief: Colleen Humfreville  

May 7th, 2012
ljdigital

Narratives in a Digital Age

What Triggers Reading in the Brain?

Amy O’Leary, a journalist and multimedia producer for The New York Times, gave the final keynote address of the Narrative Arc conference in Boston this year. In her talk, “Beyond the ‘Like’ Button: Digitally Addictive Storytelling and the Brain,”she asked journalists to think about how to keep our readers reading, and how we can cue to them that our stories going to be awesome, persuasive, funny, jaw-dropping, stimulating, inspiring, surprising, beautiful, fascinating, or informative. Then, of course, our stories have to deliver on those elements within our pieces.

In her presentation, O’Leary played a clip from her talk with NYT journalist Charles Duhigg, author of the bestselling book, “The Power of Habit.” Duhigg’s research found that: “When most people think about habits, they think about behavior. But cue and reward are much more important.”

In O’Leary’s interview of Duhigg, he noted:

“Every single habit has three parts: there’s a cue, a routine, and a reward. And a cue is like a trigger for the automatic behavior, routine is the behavior itself, a reward is why your brain, your neurology, encodes that pattern for the future. And when most people think about habits they think about behavior. Just the routine. But the cue and the reward are much more important. They’re the way that you unlock a habit.”

O’Leary said that to apply this to our work as journalists:

"Look at something like the headline as the cue. A click as the habit. And maybe a good read as the reward."

O’Leary asked Charles: What cues trigger reading? And his response on video was this:

“So I believe there are really only two cues that signal to us — or that trigger — reading. The first is the immediate proposition of value, right, I’m delivering something to you that you need right away. More than that…is surprise. I think if you immediately signal, narratively, that you are going to have surprise in your piece, than your piece works. I think surprise is the only thing that genuinely matters in creating a narrative structure.

You have to set up an expectation and then you have to violate that expectation with something even better. Once you do that, if you do that early in a piece, you signal to the reader, ‘Come along for the ride, because I promise you, where you think it’s going to end up is not where it’s going to end up. It’s going to be some place more awesome.’”

O’Leary’s big question for us to ponder: How can we signal surprise in our stories, so readers will keep reading until the end?

April 19th, 2012
ljdigital

I have seen journalists unconsciously correct the English of professional people but not working-class or poor people. A journalist must make a conscious decision about correcting a person’s grammar. I don’t think that quotes should be sanded smooth; quotation marks mean that what is enclosed in them is verbatim. I face this issue a lot because I write about regular people in the community, and real people talk real…


Letting people’s voices come through, without having the reader think the person sounds ignorant, is an ongoing struggle. It is not just a question of craft, it’s a question of our readers assumptions and biases. The problem isn’t necessarily people using nonstandard English. The problem is other people — the readers — judging them incorrectly because of that. The stories that my subjects live are amazing ones. Their humanity shines through the dangling participles.

Debra Dickerson, “Hearing Our Subjects’ Voices: Keeping It Real and True,” from “Telling True Stories: A Nonfiction Writers’ Guide From the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University.”
April 11th, 2012
Kristina Wong

"Stories are our prayers, so write and edit and tell them with due reverence, even when the stories themselves are irreverent. Stories are parables. Write and edit and tell yours with meaning so each tale stands in for a larger message, each moment is a lesson, each story a guidepost on our collective journey…

Finally, stories are our soul; so write and edit and tell yours with your whole selves. Tell them as if they are all that matters, for if that is what you do- tell our collective stories- it matters that you do it as if that is all there is.”

                                    - Jacqui Banaszynski, from Nieman Reports

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A blog created by the Literary Journalism Department @ the University of California, Irvine, dedicated to discussions about non-fiction narratives in this ever-evolving era of E-books, E-readers, Blogs, Instapaper, The Atavist, Byliner, Amazon's Kindle Singles and all other new media outlets open to promoting great journalism. LJ Digital is managed by Asst. Prof. Erika Hayasaki and Cleo Tobbi, intern and UCI literary journalism student.

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