July 5th, 2012
ljdigital
A Criminal Court judge in Manhattan ruled on Monday that Twitter must turn over to prosecutors messages sent by a Brooklyn writer during the Occupy Wall Street protests last fall. In doing so, the judge, Matthew A. Sciarrino Jr., indicated that although private speech was protected, the same did not apply to public comments on Twitter. “The Constitution gives you the right to post, but as numerous people have learned, there are still consequences for your public posts,” Judge Sciarrino wrote. “What you give to the public belongs to the public. What you keep to yourself belongs only to you.

Judge Orders Twitter to Release Protester’s Messages - NYTimes.com

Based on this ruling, we’d like to remind journalists that using direct messages onTwitter is not the best way to correspond with your sources. 

Do you think this ruling will have other implications for digital journalists?

(via onaissues)

Reblogged from ONA Issues
June 26th, 2012
ljdigital

New York Times Goes Flipboard

(photo courtesy of allthingsd)

"Now the paper says it will emulate cable TV’s “TV Everywhere” strategy, where paying subscribers can read the paper using any device or software they want." -Peter Kafka, All Things D

This is the first time the NY Times has given anyone full access to their stuff. And this is the first time that Flipboard has been granted access to a complete body of work rather than their typical handfuls of clips from newspapers and magazines. 

April 29th, 2012
ljdigital
Narratives in a Digital Age
From the NYT: “Navigating a Tightrope With Amazon”
Interesting, and relevant to class discussions: This is why we had trouble accessing Monday’s reading, “After Friday Night Lights,” on Amazon over the weekend.
According the the NYT’s David Carr:

Last Tuesday, Buzz Bissinger hopped the Amtrak train to Philadelphia from New York, where he had done a bit of publicity for “After Friday Night Lights,” a 12,000-word e-book that had been performing nicely since its release. But when he opened his laptop to check his ranking on Amazon, he found the book was no longer for sale there.
“I was stunned,” he said in a phone interview on Friday. “I thought it was some kind of technical difficulty.” (I had noticed a lot of people on Twitter shared his confusion.)
Depending on how you define it, he was right. Mr. Bissinger, the best-selling author of multiple books, including “Friday Night Lights,” had written the e-book as a postscript for the popular book about high school football in Texas. “After Friday Night Lights” traces his relationship with Boobie Miles, a running back whose football career was derailed by an injury and who has been on a hard road ever since.
Mr. Bissinger wrote the e-book for Byliner.com, one of a number of fledgling companies trying to make a go of it by publishing long-form works — not as long as a traditional book, but longer than most magazine articles — for digital readers. Mr. Bissinger thought the e-book, priced at $2.99, would be a great way to pay tribute to the relationship while also helping Mr. Miles, by giving him a third of the proceeds.
But the plan hit a pothole after Apple, which had been looking to get into shorter works in a digital format, decided to include e-books in a promotion that it does with Starbucks. It selected Mr. Bissinger’s digital sequel as a Pick of the Week, giving customers a code they could redeem online for the book. (Mr. Bissinger said he still received a royalty of $1.50 for each copy sold.)
Amazon interpreted the promotion as a price drop and lowered its price for “After Friday Night Lights” to exactly zero. Byliner withdrew the book from Amazon’s shelves, saying it did so to “protect our authors’ interest.”

Read the rest of the NYT story here.

Narratives in a Digital Age

From the NYT: “Navigating a Tightrope With Amazon

Interesting, and relevant to class discussions: This is why we had trouble accessing Monday’s reading, “After Friday Night Lights,” on Amazon over the weekend.

According the the NYT’s David Carr:

Last Tuesday, Buzz Bissinger hopped the Amtrak train to Philadelphia from New York, where he had done a bit of publicity for “After Friday Night Lights,” a 12,000-word e-book that had been performing nicely since its release. But when he opened his laptop to check his ranking on Amazon, he found the book was no longer for sale there.

“I was stunned,” he said in a phone interview on Friday. “I thought it was some kind of technical difficulty.” (I had noticed a lot of people on Twitter shared his confusion.)

Depending on how you define it, he was right. Mr. Bissinger, the best-selling author of multiple books, including “Friday Night Lights,” had written the e-book as a postscript for the popular book about high school football in Texas. “After Friday Night Lights” traces his relationship with Boobie Miles, a running back whose football career was derailed by an injury and who has been on a hard road ever since.

Mr. Bissinger wrote the e-book for Byliner.com, one of a number of fledgling companies trying to make a go of it by publishing long-form works — not as long as a traditional book, but longer than most magazine articles — for digital readers. Mr. Bissinger thought the e-book, priced at $2.99, would be a great way to pay tribute to the relationship while also helping Mr. Miles, by giving him a third of the proceeds.

But the plan hit a pothole after Apple, which had been looking to get into shorter works in a digital format, decided to include e-books in a promotion that it does with Starbucks. It selected Mr. Bissinger’s digital sequel as a Pick of the Week, giving customers a code they could redeem online for the book. (Mr. Bissinger said he still received a royalty of $1.50 for each copy sold.)

Amazon interpreted the promotion as a price drop and lowered its price for “After Friday Night Lights” to exactly zero. Byliner withdrew the book from Amazon’s shelves, saying it did so to “protect our authors’ interest.”

Read the rest of the NYT story here.

April 25th, 2012
ljdigital
Narratives in a Digital AgeWriting Assignment: Where Is the Line Between Truth and Fiction?So far, you’ve written about how you read, your life in books, and an ode to the bookshelf. This week, we will be discussing the strict differences between fact and fiction and how important those distinctions are as narrative nonfiction moves forward in the digital age.For Monday (4/30) please read this New York Times discussion of a recent controversy, during which the “This American Life” retracted a radio segment of Mike Daisey‘s solo show after its producers found out that he had made up entire parts of the story.Answer the question that the New York Times posed on its discussion page. Post your answers on the NYT web site. Keep them at about 200-300 words. 

Students: Tell us what you think about this story. Would you feel accepting or betrayed if you discovered that a powerful first-person story you had heard or read turned out not to be strictly true? When, if ever, do the interests of story take precedence over strict truth? Is there a “narrative truth” that transcends literal truth? Or is truth always the most important thing? To you, does it matter how blurry or sharp the lines are between fiction and nonfiction?

Post your answers in the comments section at the bottom of the NYT page.
(*photo credit)

Narratives in a Digital Age

Writing Assignment: Where Is the Line Between Truth and Fiction?

So far, you’ve written about how you readyour life in books, and an ode to the bookshelf. This week, we will be discussing the strict differences between fact and fiction and how important those distinctions are as narrative nonfiction moves forward in the digital age.

For Monday (4/30) please read this New York Times discussion of a recent controversy, during which the “This American Life” retracted a radio segment of Mike Daisey‘s solo show after its producers found out that he had made up entire parts of the story.

Answer the question that the New York Times posed on its discussion page. Post your answers on the NYT web site. Keep them at about 200-300 words. 

Students: Tell us what you think about this story. Would you feel accepting or betrayed if you discovered that a powerful first-person story you had heard or read turned out not to be strictly true? When, if ever, do the interests of story take precedence over strict truth? Is there a “narrative truth” that transcends literal truth? Or is truth always the most important thing? To you, does it matter how blurry or sharp the lines are between fiction and nonfiction?

Post your answers in the comments section at the bottom of the NYT page.

(*photo credit)

March 13th, 2012
ljdigital

Steve Meyers of the Poynter Institute live-tweeted from the South by Southwest Interactive panel with New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson speaking to the Texas Tribune’s Evan Smith on her role and the future of the newspaper in a digital world. A few excerpts below: 

"Steve Myers: Abramson: An odd benefit that we didn’t predict of the paywall was that circulation has risen, including the Sunday paper. (It’s worth noting that the Times has priced the subscriptions to encourage this.)"
"Steve Myers: Smith: It’s a hopeful sign that long-form is thriving, considering we’ve been told that the Web is bad for long-form journalism. "I think that’s false," she says."
Read a stream of a stream of Meyers’ tweets here,

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A blog created by the Literary Journalism Department @ the University of California, Irvine, dedicated to discussions about non-fiction narratives in this ever-evolving era of E-books, E-readers, Blogs, Instapaper, The Atavist, Byliner, Amazon's Kindle Singles and all other new media outlets open to promoting great journalism. LJ Digital is managed by Asst. Prof. Erika Hayasaki and Cleo Tobbi, intern and UCI literary journalism student.

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